persona studies journal – open CFP

Persona Studies: Call for papers, Volume 2, Issue 1: Open Call

In this open call, we invite submissions on any aspect of persona, but are particularly interested in empirical research or creative practice. Creative works and traditional article submissions could address (but are not limited to) persona in: Politics Television, film, radio Games Social media Subculture Celebrity Feminism Youth Professions and Mobile media.

For both creative and critical works, please submit a 250-300 word abstract or proposal to personastudies@deakin.edu.au by 1 December 2015.

Artists/authors will be notified of initial acceptance by December 14th. Please note that official acceptance of the work is contingent upon peer review.

Full papers (5,000-8,000 words) and projects are due 5 February 2016. For creative submissions where peer review or critical response is not desired, a full submission will be required by 1 April 2016.

Please advise in your initial proposal if you would like a creative arts review.

Persona Studies Call for Papers –

Open CFP: Research and writing on aspects of persona and persona studies

The inaugural issue of Persona Studies is scheduled for open access publication in March 2015. This exciting new journal will be preceded by a Working Papers Symposium held in Melbourne, Australia on February 5 2015, with virtual participation welcome. Abstracts are now being sought for the symposium and/or the inaugural issue of the journal.

Persona studies is an emerging area of cross-disciplinary study that investigates the presentation of the self and the masks that we use as we construct ourselves in real and virtual settings and worlds. It is an exploration of the public self and how these versions of identity come to prominence in contemporary culture. It acknowledges that we all negotiate and construct personas that we deploy and employ in work and professional environments as much as in our recreational and leisure activities: much of the emerging work in persona studies is closer studies of these particular settings and how they help frame our public selves. The field of study has antecedents that connect its work to the study of celebrity and public personalities, performance studies, media and cultural studies and game identity work, biographical research, life-writing and autobiography work along with Internet studies, communication studies, cultural anthropology, social psychology, sociology and philosophy of the self and gender studies. It has further links with areas that also look at reputation and impression management and the critical investigation of branding, self-branding and the ‘quantified self’. The journal’s intentions are to facilitate an intellectual exchange, debate and discussion around persona and its constitution. It is an invitation to investigate its varied manifestations, its patterning in contemporary culture, its differentiation in different technological and cultural settings, and its conceptual and material significance and value.

To gain a further sense of what constitutes persona studies, please see the recent special persona themed issue of M/C – Journal of Media and Culture.

Written paper submissions:

In the first instance, submit a 250-300 word abstract to personastudies@deakin.edu.au, with ‘Full Paper’ in the subject line, by 8 December 2014. You will be notified to proceed to a full length paper within a week of abstract submission. For guidelines on the preparations of your full paper, see Author Guidelines:

Full papers should be between 5000-8000 words, including citations, and will be vetted by the editorial team prior to submission for blind peer-review. Acceptance for peer review does not guarantee inclusion in the inaugural issue of the journal, but the editorial team may work with authors to develop papers for later issues. The second issue will have a special themed section on health and persona, and we encourage authors interested in this area to submit abstracts for inclusion.

Key dates – Journal

Abstract submission deadline

8 December 2014

Notification of acceptance

15 December 2014

Full papers due for peer review

13 February 2015

Final revised papers due

13 March 2015

Persona Studies journal launch

20 March 2015

Working Paper Symposium submissions:

In the first instance, submit a 250-300 word abstract to personastudies@deakin.edu.au, with ‘Working Paper’ in the subject line by 8 December 2014. We will notify by 15 December 2014. Symposium participants must submit either a 10 minute audio-visual presentation OR a 2000-3000 word written paper by 28 January. This will be circulated to workshop participants and attendees.

The symposium is designed to allow ample discussion. Therefore, each presenter will have fifteen minutes to focus on their work. In this time, you will briefly introduce your project or paper in process before shifting to group discussion. Where possible, papers on similar or complimentary themes will be presented consecutively, and more general discussion will follow each themed section. You may attend in person or participate virtually, and your paper will also be considered for inclusion in the inaugural issue of the journal.

Key dates – Symposium

Abstract submission deadline

8 December 2014

Notification of acceptance

15 December 2014

Short paper / presentation due

28 January 2015

Persona Studies Working Papers Symposium

5 February 2015

persona: a CFP

In the contemporary moment where aspects of our lives are rendered visible for display, circulation and exchange via our involvement in online cultures, investigating the concept of persona and the production of the networked self is critical to understanding the patterns and flows of everyday and extraordinary public identities.

Persona is usually perceived as a mask of identity, something that clouds and occludes a truer or raw version of ourselves, or thought of in a Goffman-like way as a form of “role-playing” and “impression management”. The production of persona can therefore be seen as something strategic, something essential to the modern experience, and ultimately something that is filled with affect and agency as the individual both constructs and inhabits these public identity formations.

Persona inhabits a space between the fictive and the real and has been explored as constitutive of what it means to be human/citizen (Cicero), what constitutes consistency of character (literary persona), what allows a public figure to negotiate a surveilled life (celebrity persona or an artistic persona), and even what kind of avatar/identity and presentation of the self is presented in play and the broader structures of social interaction and participation in game cultures (gamer persona) and fandoms. Circulating through the meaning of persona are some utopian ideals of reputation, recognition, value, and integrity that have moved to higher prominence in the contemporary moment where culture has been both individualised and personalised.

This issue of M/C Journal explores all aspects of the concept of persona. It invites articles that explore it both from a contemporary context but also those informed by the formation of persona historically. Authors are encouraged to apply the concept of persona and work through examples in a variety of areas. Some of those areas might be the following:

  • Social networks and reputation
  • Serial persona – how media construct their public identities
  • Performance and Persona
  • Political persona
  • Business persona
  • Portfolio culture and looking-for-work persona
  • Professional persona
  • The formation of reputation and persona
  • Damaged or toxic persona
  • Relationship between celebrity and persona
  • The meanings and dangers of the academic persona/the public intellectual persona
  • Constructing an aggregate persona: online monetisation and commodification of the self
  • Persona as brand
  • Institutions as personas
  • The technological persona
  • Fandom and participatory persona
  • Geek culture and the geek persona
  • Gender and persona
  • Persona in artistic and cultural practice
  • Migration, immigration and persona
  • Temporary/discardable persona
  • Gamer persona
  • Persona and publics
  • Character and persona
  • Mapping, charting or visualising online persona
  • Sport and persona

Prospective contributors should email an abstract of 100-250 words and a brief biography to the issue editors. Abstracts should include the article title and should describe your research question, approach, and argument. Biographies should be about three sentences (maximum 75 words) and should include your institutional affiliation and research interests. Articles should be 3000 words (plus bibliography). All articles will be refereed and must adhere to MLA style (6th edition).

Details

  • Article deadline: 25 Apr. 2014
  • Release date: 25 June 2014
  • Editors: P. David Marshall, Christopher Moore, and Kim Barbour

Please submit articles through this Website. Send any enquiries to persona@journal.media-culture.org.au.

Call for papers – First Monday themed special edition

Napster, 15 years on: Rethinking digital music distribution

Guest editors: Raphaël Nowak (Griffith University, Australia) and Andrew Whelan (University of Wollongong, Australia)

 

2014 marks the fifteenth anniversary of the release of the peer-to-peer application Napster. Developed by a student, Shawn Fanning, with the help of his friend Shawn Parker and uncle John Fanning, Napster established music downloading as a mass phenomenon. By 2001, 50 million users had downloaded content with Napster. Many other applications followed – Gnutella, Kazaa, LimeWire, eMule, Soulseek, BitTorrent, among others –further developing and entrenching p2p technology.

Online music distribution has been fiercely contested since Napster. Online availability has changed the way music is produced, sold, distributed, shared and consumed. While these changes are often decried or celebrated through well-rehearsed positions, their implications can also be exaggerated, as attending to contemporary industry business models and persisting analog formats would suggest.

Building on multi- and cross-disciplinary approaches addressing developments in the 15 years since the advent of Napster, we seek papers that advance contemporary debates associated with music downloading (authorized and illicit) and its consequences and ramifications. We welcome 300 word abstracts reflecting on the last 15 years in the realm of online music distribution and consumption. While attending to this broad aim, proposed articles will also address a more specific theme. Potential themes may include, but are not limited to:

  • Exchange relations and the circulation of digital objects
  • Politics and ethics of p2p practices
  • Hyper-consumption, curatorialism and open access music archives
  • Online music subcultures and (social) networks
  • Domestication of p2p and p2p as/in technoculture
  • Communications, transfer, storage, and playback hardware and infrastructure
  • Discursive framing: leeches, pirates, free music
  • Contemporary music celebrity culture
  • Suppression and criminalization of downloading and ‘copyfight’
  • Aesthetic experiences and qualities of digital music practices and rituals
  • 0day, release groups, pre-releases and leaks
  • Affordances, affects and materialities of the mp3 format
  • The evolution and ecology of music downloading
  • Direct downloads, music blogging, and online visibility
  • Monetization, markets and the business of p2p
  • Analog formats: continuity and resurgence
  • Pre-histories and futures of digital music distribution

300 word abstracts should be submitted to Raphaël Nowak (raph.nowak@gmail.com) by February 21, 2014. On the basis of these abstracts, invitations to submit papers will be sent out in early March 2014. Full papers should be submitted by June 20, 2014, and will undergo the usual First Monday peer-review process. Invitation to submit a full paper does not therefore guarantee acceptance into the issue. The themed special edition will be published November 2014.

This Call for Papers can be found in pdf format at http://bit.ly/1dnKzFe. Please forward as appropriate to interested parties.

 Raphaël Nowak <raph.nowak@gmail.com>

Andrew Whelan <awhelan@uow.edu.au>